Friday, January 20, 2017

Writing Poetry: "I Am From" Poems



Introduction to 'I Am From' Poems  This school year we have read and analyzed the poems of others. Now it's time to write our own. Since this will be one of the first attempts for some of us at writing poetry, I thought it would be a good idea for us all to use a similar format that is scaffolded and accessible. Today we will begin writing "I Am From" poems.

A poem by George Ella Lyon called "Where I’m From" is the inspiration for this activity. In her poem Lyon uses descriptive language and sensory details to tell the story of the everyday things, people, and places that together tell the story of where she comes from. You can read her poem here and watch the video version below. 

                                       

The poem lends itself to imitation and many have tried, including students. Check out some of the student examples below. 


By Evelyn from Lakeview Middle School




Writing Your Own "I Am From" Poem  Now it's your turn to write a poem that illustrates where you are from. The "I Am From" Poem template can be found in your Language Arts Google Classroom. If you're having trouble getting started and would like an opportunity to brainstorm ideas before drafting your poem, try using the "I Am From" Pre-Write document, which can also be found in your Language Arts Google Classroom

As you move forward in the writing process and begin to improve and revise your poem, consider adding more sensory details. A handy list of sensory details can be found here

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Poetry: "Oranges" and Sensory Details

The poem "Oranges" is featured in the book of poetry Fire in My Hands By Gary Soto 

 Today's Learning Objectives   To understand and appreciate poetry and to recognize imagery and its effects. 

"Oranges" by Gary Soto: Noting Sensory Details  Today we will read the poem "Oranges" by Gary Soto, which is rich with imagery and sensory details.  Remember that writers use sensory details to appeal to a reader's senses -- sight, hearing, touch, smell, and taste. These details can help the reader visualize the scene the writer is describing and create images that evoke feelings within the reader.

As we read "Oranges" take note of Gary Soto's use of sensory details using the document "Oranges" - Sensory Details, which can be found in your Language Arts Google Classroom.






Homework  Continue working on the "Oranges" - Sensory Detailswhich is due tomorrow, Friday, January 20